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KnightLite’s FYBO 2017

KnightLite’s FYBO 2017

Each year at this time, the the Arizona ScQRPions sponsor the Freeze Your Buns Off QRP Sprint.

Stations who set up in colder environments receive higher points multipliers:

Temperature: 65F=x1, 50-64F=x2, 40-49F=x3, 30-39F=x4, 20-29F=x5,<20F=x6

A small group of hearty KnightLites braved the cold temperature using the KnightLite’s Club Call, WQ4RP.

Rob K3COD and Joe WA4GIR were operating 40M and 20M respectively upon my arrival at Harris Lake State Park near Raleigh, NC.  The temperature on Joe’s thermometer was reading 37F, which provided a points multiplier of 4.  Both stations were using inverted vees supported by nearby pine trees.

 

Rob K3COD and Joe WA4GIR Operating FYBO 2017

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CQWW160M CW Contest from KnightLite’s Excalibur QRP Antenna Site

CQWW160M CW Contest from KnightLite’s Excalibur QRP Antenna Site

Dick (N4HAY/ZS6RSH) and I decided to enter the CQWW160M CW Contest  as a multi-op,  meaning two or more operators share a single transmitter and callsign. As there is no QRP multi-op category for this contest, we would be competing with stations running KW amplifiers.

The advantages of running QRP multi-op is that we could both plan on getting some sleep during the long 5PM-8AM nite time shifts, we were working toward a common goal, and we could operate assisted mode.  

Our main goal was to have fun and to see how our newly constructed Excalibur 160M vertical would play.

Station WQ4RP

Station WQ4RP consisted of a Ten Tec Argonaut VI, running 5W output into the Excalibur vertical loop.  We used N1MM+ logger with a WinKeyer.

 

CQWW160 CW 2016 station

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A QRP Odyssey to Portsmouth Island

A QRP Odyssey to Portsmouth Island


Throughout my life, I have often felt the need to seek nature’s solitude.  When I was a young lad, I would walk a couple miles to my best friend’s house, and then we would continue walking to one of several farm ponds on the outskirts of our small town to do some fishing or to explore the surrounding woods.

Years later, I still find myself seeking quiet, out of the way spots, whether it be deep in the woods, along a riverbank, or at the sea coast.

I invite you to return with me to one of those special places, Cedar Island, which I first visited in 2003, and have later returned to several times.

 

Cedar Island Sign

 

Cedar Island is easy to find.  You take NC Hwy 12 East until the road dead ends at the Pamlico Sound.  As you approach Cedar Island, you will see vast areas covered with sawgrass and narrow waterways.

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CQ US Islands Contest de AA4XX Harker’s Island

CQ US Islands Contest de AA4XX Harker’s Island

Harker’s Island is located down east, about as far east as you can drive before the highway gives way to the sea.  Fortunately, the island is readily accessible by car via a causeway.

 Harker's Island casueway allows access by car

I selected Harker’s Island as a good site to operate the US Islands Contest.  It’s a rather lengthy (3-1/2 hr) drive from home, but this island has a lot going for it–beautiful vistas of neighboring islands and villages, friendly locals, first class seafood, and several ideal locations to set up antennas.

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Lightning Strikes AA4XX Radio Shack

Lightning Strikes AA4XX Radio Shack

One sultry afternoon in August of 2011, a series of severe thunderstorms passed over my property, and upon arriving home after work, I decided to walk  the 1/4 mile or so from my house to make sure everything was OK at the radio site.

The only immediate sign of damage was a melted piece of ladder line near where it entered the shack

lightning melted ladder line

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Winter QRP Expedition to Lea Hutaff Island

Winter QRP Expedition to Lea Hutaff Island

One of my favorite places in the world is Lea Hutaff Island, situated off the SE coast of North Carolina, between Topsail Island and Fiqure Eight Island.

There are no people living on the island, but this was not always the case. The Lea family house is the only dwelling still standing on the island, and it is not uncommon to see waves breaking underneath during high tide.

Last remaining dwelling on Lea Island

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